Unique Trees

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

            Trees can add value to your home, provide shade, windbreaks, and a cleaner environment.  You can plant a single tree to be used as a focal point or plant multiple trees to create your own beautiful woodland.  Here are a few unique trees that would be great additions to your yard: 

Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) is an eye-catching ornamental tree.  Known for its unique leaf and flower shapes, this tree also turns a magnificent yellow color in the fall.  The tulip tree gets its name for the tulip-shaped cream, green, or orange flowers that bloom in the spring.  Reaching heights of up to 90 feet tall and 50 feet wide, the tulip tree has a rapid growth rate at first and then slows down with age.  It prefers full sun and well-drained soil.  This tree is hardy to Zone 5 but can grow very well in the Green Lake area if given some slight protection.

‘Pink Chimes’ Japanese Snowbell (Styrax japonicus) is a charming ornamental tree, growing up to 25 feet tall and wide.  It is a great tree to use for shade cover with its slightly weeping canopy.  Pink flowers bloom in May and then turn into gray-brown drupes that last until the fall.  This tree prefers full sun to part shade and grows best in organically rich, well-drained soil.  As the tree gets older, the gray bark naturally forms slight cracks unveiling a beautiful orange inner layer creating aesthetic value during the winter months. 

‘Persian Spire’ Persian Ironwood (Parrotia persica)is a beautiful specimen with its foliage that emerges purple and matures to green with purple tinted edges that linger into the summer months.  The leaves then turn stunning colors of yellow, orange, and red in the fall.  The attractive flaky bark adds beauty, even in the winter months.  This tree prefers partial to full sun and well-drained soils with constant moisture.  Persian spire reaches heights of up to 25 feet tall and 15 feet wide. 

These trees and other stunning trees are available at Bloch’s Farm.  Many shrubs and perennials are available as well!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions. Visit our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  

Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! August 28th – August 30th: 30% Off Sand Zen Gardens and Terrarium Kits!  

Shade Tolerant Perennials

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

Do you have a shaded area in your garden that needs a splash of color?  Many varieties of plants can tolerate shade, even though they may prefer sun if provided with adequate moisture.  Other plants are shade-loving such as the bleeding heart which will bloom in spring but die back during the summer if planted in a sunny area.  Here are a few ideas for shade tolerant flowering perennials:

Astilbe (Astilbe) has lacey fern-like foliage with soft feathery flowers that attract butterflies.  Blooming spring to summer, flower colors range from purple, pink, red, and white.  Reaching heights of up to 5 feet and 30 inches wide, astilbe prefers well-drained, consistently moist soil with lots of organic matter.

Ligularia (Ligularia) is a long-living, deer resistant perennial.  Producing long yellow flower spikes atop large, lustrous foliage, this perennial is a real stunner.  Birds are attracted to its blooms which form from summer to fall, depending on the variety.   Growing up to 6 feet high and 4 feet wide, ligularia prefers rich, consistently moist soil.  With the long, deep roots it produces, ligularia does better with deep watering.  It doesn’t like to dry out, and may wilt in the heat, but bounces back once given a thorough watering and when the heat of the day passes.   

Lady’s Mantle (Alchemilla mollis)is a hardy, old-fashioned perennial that grows well in partial shade.  Although tolerant of most soil conditions, it does best in average, well-drained soil with adequate moisture.  Stalks of dainty yellow flowers sit atop a mound of velvety foliage.  Blooming late spring to early summer, the flowers attract butterflies.  Lady’s mantle can grow up to 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide.  It is usually left alone by deer and rabbits.

Goat’s Beard (Aruncus) resembles astilbe with the fern-like foliage and light feathery cream-colored flowers, which bloom late spring to summer.  Goat’s beard grows best in moist, rich soil mixed with organic matter.  This low maintenance perennial can grow up to 6 feet tall and wide in sun to partial shade.

Other shade tolerant perennials include coral bell, cimicifuga, and hosta.  For more ideas stop in at Bloch’s Farm and ask one of our knowledgeable staff members.      

Bloch’s Farm has many trees, shrubs, and perennials available!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions. Visit our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! August 21st – August 23rd : 30% Off Native Plants!

Deer Resistant Perennials

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

Do you have problems with those pesky deer nibbling at the beautiful flowers you worked so hard to grow?  While plants are not typically considered “deer-proof,” here are a few perennials that deer may find less tasty than others:  

Blue False Indigo (Baptisia) is a long-living, shrub-like, hardy perennial that provides interest all four seasons.  Growing up to 4 feet tall and 6 feet wide, this plant produces long stalks of blue-green foliage with stunning spikes of flowers at the crown.  Blooming in late spring to early summer, flower colors range from blue, violet, white, or yellow attracting bees and butterflies.  Once done blooming, showy green seed pods emerge, which turn charcoal black as they ripen, and last into the winter months.  Baptisia grows best in full sun with average to poor, well-drained soil.  Once established, it is moderately drought tolerant.  Plant this eye-catching specimen alone or in small groupings with annuals or other perennials.  

‘Hummelo’ Stachys (Stachys monieri) was voted perennial plant of the year for 2019.  It has low-growing, mounded, dark green, ruffled-edge foliage with long elegant lavender-pink spiked flower heads that attract pollinators.  Blooming early to late summer, it is best to deadhead spent flowers to keep this plant looking exquisite.  Growing up to 2 feet tall and 1 foot wide, this perennial prefers full sun and moist, but well-drained soil.  ‘Hummelo’ looks stunning by itself or in mass plantings paired with ornamental grasses or other perennials.  

Salvia (Salvia) comes in many different sizes and colors.  In our region there are annual and perennial varieties.  The perennial varieties can grow up to 30 inches tall and 24 inches wide.  Fragrant foliage gives way to beautiful flower spikes, which bloom late spring to mid-summer, and attract pollinators.  Cutting back the plant after flowering will encourage reblooming, which can last until the fall in some varieties.  Preferring full sun and well-drained soil, this perennial can be drought tolerant but with average moisture will bloom better.  

Other perennials that are deer resistant include: bleeding heart, globe thistle, Russian sage, and yarrow.  For more ideas stop in at Bloch’s Farm and ask one of our knowledgeable staff members.  Bloch’s Farm also sells 100% organic Green Screen Deer and Rabbit Repellent in pouches or loose powder.  

Bloch’s Farm has many trees, shrubs, and perennials available!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions. Visit our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  

Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! August 14th – August 16th: Take An Additional 30% Off Already Reduced Sale Items Located In The Barn Shop!

Drought Tolerant Plants

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

During this time of year, many varieties of plants are likely to require more water.  However, some flowers, shrubs, and trees can be quite tolerant of hot, dry conditions. 

Drought tolerant plants need a healthy combination of well-drained soil and the right amount of sunlight.  They often require little to no fertilization.  Stop in at Bloch’s Farm to stock up on drought-resistant perennials, shrubs, and trees!  Here are a few suggestions:  

Russian Sage (Perevoskia) is a woody-based plant that grows 3-5 feet tall and 2-3 feet wide in full sun.  The beautiful silvery-gray foliage and attractive lavender flowers, which bloom from mid- to late summer, make this perennial a real stunner.  The large root system it develops makes it able to thrive in even the toughest conditions, and it would look great planted in a mixed border.  

Sedums (Sedum) come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors.  The creeping sedums are an excellent choice for eye-catching, low growing ground cover.  These sedums have fleshy, light green leaves, and produce small star-shaped flowers that show white, yellow, and pinkish to burgundy tones.  The taller varieties can reach 3 feet in height, have green and purple succulent foliage, and produce heavy flat-topped flower heads that bloom in late summer and fall.  Sedums grow best planted in full sun but there are some varieties that can tolerate part shade.

Dwarf Bush Honeysuckle (Diervilla) is a small 2-3 feet shrub that will grow almost anywhere.  Preferring sun or shade, this shrub has glossy bronze-green foliage that turns orange-red in the fall.  Flower colors ranging from yellow, orange, or red bloom in the summer.  This shrub is great for planting on hedges or on slopes to control erosion because of its spreading growth habit.

Tiger Eyes Cutleaf Sumac (Rhus Typhina) is a larger shrub reaching 6-8 ft tall and wide.  With its bright yellow foliage that slightly turns orange and scarlet in the fall, it makes a beautiful specimen plant in any landscape.

American Elm (Ulmus)is a moderately fast growing, long living, hardy tree.  Reaching heights of 70 feet tall and 60 feet wide, this tree prefers full sun to part shade.  Elms are tolerant of poor soil conditions, poor drainage, and air pollution, among several other things.  These trees are popular for their large leafy canopies that provide excellent shade. 

Bloch’s Farm has a great selection of trees, shrubs, and perennials available!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions.  Visit our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! August 7th – August 9th: Buy 3 Daylilies, Get One On Us!

Caring for Plants During Heat and Drought

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

            Even though the length of the summer growing season in our region can be shorter than in other locations, heat and dry conditions can still stress our plants.  Besides choosing drought-tolerant perennials and refraining from the use of fertilizers during the hottest periods, there are a few watering strategies that can assist plants through the summer heat.   

Proper watering is essential during hot, dry conditions.  There are many convenient watering methods available.  A hand watering wand allows you to water near the base of the plant.  You can also use soaker hoses, garden sprinklers, or a drip irrigation system.  Make sure that the water is applied slowly, so it soaks in rather than running off. 

Water early in the morning, before the heat of the day, to minimize evaporation.  To ensure more efficient root systems, water thoroughly, making sure the water sinks deep into the roots.  Try to avoid watering in the late evening.  Without the sun to dry off the leaves, the plants become more susceptible to diseases.  

During periods of dry summer heat, most trees and shrubs benefit from receiving 1 to 2 inches of water every week.  Water-loving trees such as willows, birches, alders, poplars, and fruit trees may need at least 3 inches of water per week when temperatures climb above 90 degrees.  Small shrubs and perennials should receive at least 1 inch of water over their entire root area 2-3 times a week.  Newly transplanted plants may need to be watered daily.  

It’s best to apply water in one slow application.  A useful tip for measuring water is to place a 1-inch deep can, such as a tuna fish or cat food can, near the drip-line of the plants you are watering.  As soon as the can is filled, you have one inch of water.  For plants that need 2-3 inches of water, simply empty the can, and allow it to refill once or twice more.  

Mulching around the base of trees, shrubs, and flowers helps them retain water, and removing weeds prevents plants from having to compete for water and nutrients.  If you notice a plant that is wilting, a little investigation may be necessary.  Wilting can be a sign of heat-stress, and a bit of shade may need to be offered to plants such as hydrangeas and ligularias.  Too much or too little water can also cause wilting, so dig down about six inches to see if the soil is too moist or too dry.  If none of these seems to be the problem, check to see if the plant may be suffering from an insect or disease problem.        

Bloch’s Farm has a great selection of trees, shrubs, and perennials available!  We also have watering wands and mulch available!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions.  Visit our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! July 31st – August 2nd: 75% Off Tropical Plants!

Rain Gardens

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

                A rain garden can add beauty to your yard, provide habitat for beneficial insects and wildlife, and help protect water resources.  A rain garden is a shallow depression where native shrubs, flowers and grasses can grow and soak up rainwater and melted snow from your home’s downspouts, driveway, or lawn.  Managing water runoff improves the overall health of the environment.  

When designing a rain garden there are some key components to consider such as the location of the garden placement, the type of soil you have, and the size of garden you would like. Do you have a place in your yard that is a naturally occurring low area where roof runoff collects or into which downspouts empty?   Position your rain garden at least 10 feet from any foundation.  

The type of soil you have will determine the kinds of plants that will thrive in your space. Sandy soils will drain more quickly while heavy clay-enriched soil will retain moisture longer.  

As far as the size of your garden, a good rule of thumb is for it to be one-third as large as the roof area that drains into it.  If your primary goal is to replenish the groundwater, then you will want to dig a deeper, smaller garden.  If the soil is sandy, a smaller area may suffice, but if you have an abundance of clay-enriched soils, you will need a larger rain garden. 

Many perennials native to Wisconsin will thrive in your rain garden due to their long roots which support them during spells of extreme weather, both wet and dry.  The native plants will act as filters to clean the water before it enters back into the ecosystem. 

Remember to consider your soil and light conditions when choosing plants. Here are a few suggestions for your garden: 

Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum) – height: 2-4 feet; requires full sun to partial shade; white flowers bloom July- October.

Sweet Joe-Pye Weed (Eupatorium purpureum) – height: 3-7 feet; full sun to partial shade; purple flowers bloom July- September.

Nodding Pink Onion (Allium cernuum) – height: 1-2 feet; full to partial sun; light pink flowers bloom July- August.

Cup Plant (Silphium perfoliatum) – height: 4 – 8 feet; full to partial sun; yellow flowers bloom early to mid-summer. 

Stop in today to get native plants for your rain garden!  Bloch’s Farm has many tree, shrub, and perennials available!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions. Visit our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! July 24th – 26th: 20% Off Evergreen Trees and Evergreen Shrubs!

Native Plants

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

The definition of a native plant can differ among gardeners.  One way a native plant might be described is a tree, shrub, vine, or perennial that was growing in a place in Wisconsin before European settlement and without human introduction or intervention.     

While some may think that native plants contribute to a disheveled look in a garden, they are well adapted to Wisconsin soils and climate and can survive in the most challenging landscapes.  They require less water and fertilizer and have few insect or disease problems.  In addition, the deep roots of native plants can help control erosion and runoff.  Natives attract pollinators and provide food and shelter for a variety of wildlife.  Using native plants increases biodiversity and the health of our environment.

When designing a native garden, one must consider the planting location.  Is the area hot and dry?  Or shady with soil that stays continually moist?   Choose natives plant species that can survive in your location. 

Natives tolerant of dry locations: Lead Plant (Amorpha canescens), Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa), Prairie Coreopsis (Coreopsis palmata), Purple Prairie Clover (Dalea purpurea), Rattlesnake Master (Eryngium yuccifolium), Prairie Alum Root (Heuchera richardsonii), Lupine (Lupinus perennis), Prairie Cinquefoil (Potentilla pensylvanica), Compass Plant (Silphium laciniatum), Switch Grass (Panicum virgatum), Prairie Dropseed (Sporobolius heterolepsis), American Hazelnut (Corylus Americana), White Oak (Quercus alba), Elm (Ulmus sp.

Natives tolerant of moist soil: Meadow Anemone (Anemone canadensis), Lady Fern (Athyrium filix-femina), Wild Senna (Cassia hebecarpa), Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum), Monkey Flower (Mimulus ringens), Cinnamon Fern (Osmunda cinnamomea), Switch Grass (Panicum virgatum), Cup plant (Silphium perfoliatum), River Birch (Betula nigra), American Larch (Larix laricina), Willow (Salix sp.

Natives tolerant of shade: Lady Fern (Athyrium filix-femina), Wild Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis), Purple Joe-Pye Weed (Eupatorium purpureum), Wild Geranium (Geranium maculatum), Cinnamon Fern (Osmunda cinnamomea), Hemlock (Conium maculatum), Witchazel (Hamamelis virginiana), Snowberry (Symphoricarpos sp.)

Stop in today to find plants native to Wisconsin!  Bloch’s Farm has many tree, shrub, and perennial natives available.  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions. Visit our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! July 17th – 19th  25% Off Perennials and Native Plants!

Planting for Pollinators

 By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

Most flowering plants need sun, fertile soil, water, and pollinators to reproduce.   In addition, the fruits and seeds consumed by people and animals depend on pollinators to transfer pollen from one flower to another.  Without cross-pollination, or moving pollen from one plant to another, many types of plants and trees will be unable to produce fruits and seeds.  

The nectar that plants produce attracts pollinators.  As the common Wisconsin insect pollinators such as bees, butterflies, moths, wasps, and flies travel from flower to flower, they gather nectar and transfer pollen.  Planting clumps of flowers that bloom in a variety of colors and shapes from spring to fall will provide food and nesting habitats for pollinators.  

Any plant that flowers is a food source, but native plants are ideal.  Here are a few plants, trees, and shrubs that can benefit pollinators throughout spring, summer, and fall:

Spring Blooms:  Geranium (Geranium sp.), Maple (Acer sp.) Eastern Redbud (Cercis Canadensis), Dogwood (Corylus sp.), Willow (Salix sp.), Cherry trees (Prunus sp.), Apple and Crabapple trees (Malus sp.), Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), Linden tree (Tilia sp.).

Spring to Summer Blooms:  Blue False Indigo (Baptisa sp.), Bee Balm (Monarda sp.), Beardtongue (Penstemon sp.), Lupine (Lupinus sp.)

Summer Blooms: Tickseed (Coreopsis sp.), Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa), Pagoda Dogwood (Cornus alternifolia), Sumac (Rhus sp.), Japanese Lilac Tree (Syringa reticulata), Seven-son flower (Heptacodium miconioides

Summer to Fall Blooms: Black Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia sp.), Coneflower (Echinacea sp.), Joe Pye Weed (Eupatorium sp.)

Stop in today to get your pollinator plants!  Bloch’s Farm has many tree, shrub, and plant varieties available!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions. Visit our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! July 10th – 12th 50% off select garden décor!

Attracting Hummingbirds

 By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

            There’s something special about tiny hummingbirds flitting acrobatically around the garden like little helicopters.  To attract hummingbirds, as with all birds, design a diverse multi-tiered habitat with a variety of trees, shrubs, grasses, and vines suitable for providing shade, protection, nesting supplies, and food.  Plant lots of annuals and perennials that are brightly colored, especially red and orange varieties.  Plants with tubular shaped blossoms contain nectar that is highly sought after by hummingbirds.  Here are a few ideas for plants to add to your yard: 

Trees, shrubs, and vines: Juniper (Juniperus sp.), Willow (Salix sp.), Serviceberry (Amelanchier sp.), Butterfly Bush (Buddleia sp.), Flowering Dogwood (Cornus sp.), Snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus), Lilac (Syringa sp.), Trumpet Honeysuckle Vine (Lonicera sempervirens).

Annuals: Million Bells (Calibrachoa sp.), Canna (Canna sp.), Cuphea (Cuphea sp.), Flowering Tobacco (Nicotiana mutabilis), Nasturtium (Tropaeolum sp.), Petunia (Petunia sp.), Salvia (Salvia sp.), and Zinnia (Zinnia sp.).

            Perennials: Hyssop (Agastache sp.), Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis), Bee Balm (Monarda sp.), Catmint (Nepeta sp.), Penstemon (Penstemon sp.), Salvia (Salvia sp.), Veronica (Veronica sp.).

            Hummingbirds feed 3-5 times per hour; therefore, adding bright feeders with red parts placed around your garden can provide extra food, especially when there is a period when flowers are not blooming.  A sugar-water mix is the best option to put in your feeders.  Just mix 1-part sugar to 4-parts water.  

Besides providing feeders, it is ideal to add water features such as bird baths and sprinklers that furnish fresh water and bathing sources for hummingbirds.   Placing beacons around the yard can lure hummingbirds to the area, as well.  Adding items such as red ribbons or artificial flowers in the early spring can help attract hummingbirds. 

            Stop in today to stock up on plants that attract hummingbirds to your garden!  Bloch’s Farm has many tree, shrub, and plant varieties available!  We also have fountains and bird baths to complete your perfect hummingbird habitat!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions. You can also check out our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! July 3rd- 5th 50% off annuals and tropicals!

Attracting Birds to Your Garden

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

            Are you interested in attracting more birds to your garden?  If so, it’s important to create a suitable year-round habitat by providing shelter and nesting sites for birds, as well as food and water sources.  You might be interested in further developing some of your lawn areas by planting trees, both deciduous and evergreen, along with shrubs and ornamental grasses.  Birds need a safe place to build nests and to escape bad weather and predators.  Annuals and perennials also help to provide shelter, food, and water.  

Trees, shrubs, and grasses can provide birds with nesting sites and nesting materials.  The taller the varieties, the more cover is available for birds to use.  Along with fruits that are produced in different seasons, and seed-bearing cones, some species of trees and shrubs attract insects which also provide a food source for birds.  Here are a few examples of beneficial additions to your yard: 

Trees:  Pine (Pinus sp.), Hemlock (Tsuga Canadensis), Spruce (Picea sp.), Juniper (Juniperus sp.), Maple (Acer sp.), Crabapple (Malus sp.), Cherry (Prunus sp.), Oak (Quercus sp.), Quaking Aspen (Populus sp.).

Shrubs:  Barberry (Berberis thunbergii), Dogwood (Cornus sp.), Currant (Ribes sp.), Sumac (Rhus sp.), Rose (Rosa sp.), Spirea (Spiraea sp.), Viburnum (Viburnum sp.).

Grasses:  Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), Muhly (Muhlenbergia sp.), Switchgrass (Panicum sp.), Little Bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), Prairie Dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepsis). 

Annuals and perennials not only add beauty to your garden, they produce nectar and seeds that are yummy treats for birds.  Some seeds even remain a food source throughout the winter months.  Flowering plants also attract insects which are a main source of food for many birds.  There are many easy-to-grow flowers to add to your garden to attract birds: 

Perennials:  Coneflower (Echinacea), Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia), Cardinal Flower (Lobelia), Catmint (Nepeta), Bee Balm (Monarda), Garden Phlox (Phlox), Bleeding Heart (Dicentra).

Annuals:  Snapdragon (Antirrhinum sp.), Sunflower (Helianthus sp.), Petunias (Petunia sp.), Salvia (Salvia sp.), Marigold (Tagetes sp.), and Verbena (Verbena sp.) are just a few examples that attract birds to your yard. 

Water features can be big attractions in your garden if kept well-maintained and clean.  Small ponds with waterfalls, bird baths and fountains are great ways to provide bathing and drinking opportunities for your feathered friends.  

Stop in today to stock up on plants that attract birds to your garden!  Bloch’s Farm has many tree, shrub, and plant varieties available!  We also have fountains and bird baths to complete your perfect bird habitat!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions.  You can also check out our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and be our friend on Facebook.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale!  June 26th – 28th 20% off native perennials and butterfly host plants!