Planting for Pollinators

 By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

Most flowering plants need sun, fertile soil, water, and pollinators to reproduce.   In addition, the fruits and seeds consumed by people and animals depend on pollinators to transfer pollen from one flower to another.  Without cross-pollination, or moving pollen from one plant to another, many types of plants and trees will be unable to produce fruits and seeds.  

The nectar that plants produce attracts pollinators.  As the common Wisconsin insect pollinators such as bees, butterflies, moths, wasps, and flies travel from flower to flower, they gather nectar and transfer pollen.  Planting clumps of flowers that bloom in a variety of colors and shapes from spring to fall will provide food and nesting habitats for pollinators.  

Any plant that flowers is a food source, but native plants are ideal.  Here are a few plants, trees, and shrubs that can benefit pollinators throughout spring, summer, and fall:

Spring Blooms:  Geranium (Geranium sp.), Maple (Acer sp.) Eastern Redbud (Cercis Canadensis), Dogwood (Corylus sp.), Willow (Salix sp.), Cherry trees (Prunus sp.), Apple and Crabapple trees (Malus sp.), Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), Linden tree (Tilia sp.).

Spring to Summer Blooms:  Blue False Indigo (Baptisa sp.), Bee Balm (Monarda sp.), Beardtongue (Penstemon sp.), Lupine (Lupinus sp.)

Summer Blooms: Tickseed (Coreopsis sp.), Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa), Pagoda Dogwood (Cornus alternifolia), Sumac (Rhus sp.), Japanese Lilac Tree (Syringa reticulata), Seven-son flower (Heptacodium miconioides

Summer to Fall Blooms: Black Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia sp.), Coneflower (Echinacea sp.), Joe Pye Weed (Eupatorium sp.)

Stop in today to get your pollinator plants!  Bloch’s Farm has many tree, shrub, and plant varieties available!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions. Visit our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! July 10th – 12th 50% off select garden décor!

Attracting Hummingbirds

 By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

            There’s something special about tiny hummingbirds flitting acrobatically around the garden like little helicopters.  To attract hummingbirds, as with all birds, design a diverse multi-tiered habitat with a variety of trees, shrubs, grasses, and vines suitable for providing shade, protection, nesting supplies, and food.  Plant lots of annuals and perennials that are brightly colored, especially red and orange varieties.  Plants with tubular shaped blossoms contain nectar that is highly sought after by hummingbirds.  Here are a few ideas for plants to add to your yard: 

Trees, shrubs, and vines: Juniper (Juniperus sp.), Willow (Salix sp.), Serviceberry (Amelanchier sp.), Butterfly Bush (Buddleia sp.), Flowering Dogwood (Cornus sp.), Snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus), Lilac (Syringa sp.), Trumpet Honeysuckle Vine (Lonicera sempervirens).

Annuals: Million Bells (Calibrachoa sp.), Canna (Canna sp.), Cuphea (Cuphea sp.), Flowering Tobacco (Nicotiana mutabilis), Nasturtium (Tropaeolum sp.), Petunia (Petunia sp.), Salvia (Salvia sp.), and Zinnia (Zinnia sp.).

            Perennials: Hyssop (Agastache sp.), Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis), Bee Balm (Monarda sp.), Catmint (Nepeta sp.), Penstemon (Penstemon sp.), Salvia (Salvia sp.), Veronica (Veronica sp.).

            Hummingbirds feed 3-5 times per hour; therefore, adding bright feeders with red parts placed around your garden can provide extra food, especially when there is a period when flowers are not blooming.  A sugar-water mix is the best option to put in your feeders.  Just mix 1-part sugar to 4-parts water.  

Besides providing feeders, it is ideal to add water features such as bird baths and sprinklers that furnish fresh water and bathing sources for hummingbirds.   Placing beacons around the yard can lure hummingbirds to the area, as well.  Adding items such as red ribbons or artificial flowers in the early spring can help attract hummingbirds. 

            Stop in today to stock up on plants that attract hummingbirds to your garden!  Bloch’s Farm has many tree, shrub, and plant varieties available!  We also have fountains and bird baths to complete your perfect hummingbird habitat!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions. You can also check out our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale! July 3rd- 5th 50% off annuals and tropicals!

Attracting Birds to Your Garden

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

            Are you interested in attracting more birds to your garden?  If so, it’s important to create a suitable year-round habitat by providing shelter and nesting sites for birds, as well as food and water sources.  You might be interested in further developing some of your lawn areas by planting trees, both deciduous and evergreen, along with shrubs and ornamental grasses.  Birds need a safe place to build nests and to escape bad weather and predators.  Annuals and perennials also help to provide shelter, food, and water.  

Trees, shrubs, and grasses can provide birds with nesting sites and nesting materials.  The taller the varieties, the more cover is available for birds to use.  Along with fruits that are produced in different seasons, and seed-bearing cones, some species of trees and shrubs attract insects which also provide a food source for birds.  Here are a few examples of beneficial additions to your yard: 

Trees:  Pine (Pinus sp.), Hemlock (Tsuga Canadensis), Spruce (Picea sp.), Juniper (Juniperus sp.), Maple (Acer sp.), Crabapple (Malus sp.), Cherry (Prunus sp.), Oak (Quercus sp.), Quaking Aspen (Populus sp.).

Shrubs:  Barberry (Berberis thunbergii), Dogwood (Cornus sp.), Currant (Ribes sp.), Sumac (Rhus sp.), Rose (Rosa sp.), Spirea (Spiraea sp.), Viburnum (Viburnum sp.).

Grasses:  Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), Muhly (Muhlenbergia sp.), Switchgrass (Panicum sp.), Little Bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), Prairie Dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepsis). 

Annuals and perennials not only add beauty to your garden, they produce nectar and seeds that are yummy treats for birds.  Some seeds even remain a food source throughout the winter months.  Flowering plants also attract insects which are a main source of food for many birds.  There are many easy-to-grow flowers to add to your garden to attract birds: 

Perennials:  Coneflower (Echinacea), Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia), Cardinal Flower (Lobelia), Catmint (Nepeta), Bee Balm (Monarda), Garden Phlox (Phlox), Bleeding Heart (Dicentra).

Annuals:  Snapdragon (Antirrhinum sp.), Sunflower (Helianthus sp.), Petunias (Petunia sp.), Salvia (Salvia sp.), Marigold (Tagetes sp.), and Verbena (Verbena sp.) are just a few examples that attract birds to your yard. 

Water features can be big attractions in your garden if kept well-maintained and clean.  Small ponds with waterfalls, bird baths and fountains are great ways to provide bathing and drinking opportunities for your feathered friends.  

Stop in today to stock up on plants that attract birds to your garden!  Bloch’s Farm has many tree, shrub, and plant varieties available!  We also have fountains and bird baths to complete your perfect bird habitat!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions.  You can also check out our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and be our friend on Facebook.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale!  June 26th – 28th 20% off native perennials and butterfly host plants!

Hydrangeas That Bloom On Old Wood

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

Last week’s topic was hydrangeas that bloom on new wood.  The subject for this week’s article is hydrangeas that bloom on old wood.  Blooming on “old wood” means that buds will flower on the wood grown in the previous season. This means that these types of hydrangeas should be pruned, not in early spring like the smooth and panicle varieties, but rather after they have finished blooming in mid-summer.

 To determine which type of hydrangea you have, make note of when it flowers.  Hydrangeas that bloom on old wood often begin flowering in early summer as opposed to hydrangeas that bloom on new wood in mid- to late summer.  

To keep the shrubs looking nice, you can snip a few of the oldest or tallest stems near the soil line and clip off spent blooms just below the flower head.  Old canes often produce smaller flowers, so pruning these will improve the appearance of the shrub.  Winter protection is important for these types of hydrangeas.  

An example of a hydrangea that blooms on old wood is the Oakleaf (Hydrangea quercifolia).  The 5 to 8-foot tall Oakleaf gets its name for its oak-shaped foliage that turns to beautiful mahogany colors in autumn.  This hydrangea provides visual interest in all four seasons with browned blooms and cinnamon-colored peeling bark remaining in winter, grayish green foliage in spring, and deep green leaves and conical-shaped flowers that range from white to pink in summer.  Keeping the soil moist is important and a layer of mulch will help retain moisture. 

Another type of hydrangea that blooms on old wood is the Climbing hydrangea (Hydrangea petiolaris).  These unique woody vines have fragrant white lace-cap flowers and attractive foliage that vigorously grows up any structure and needs no trellis due to its clinging habit.  These can grow up to 80 feet long.

Some types of hydrangeas bloom on both new and old wood.  Take the Bigleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla) varieties, such as the Endless Summer series and the Let’s Dance series, for instance.  The flower colors range from pink, blue, or purple, and in some varieties by changing the soil pH, the flower color can change.  Shrub sizes range from 2 to 6 feet tall.

Another type of hydrangea that blooms on old and new wood are the Mountain varieties (Hydrangea serrata), which includes the Tuff Stuff series.  This variety is known for its lace-cap flower clusters that bloom in mid-summer and foliage that turns red or burgundy in the fall.  Shrub sizes vary from the 1 ½ -foot tall Tiny Tuff Stuff to the 3-foot tall Tuff Stuff.

Stop in today to get your strikingly gorgeous hydrangeas!  Bloch’s Farm has many varieties available!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions. You can also check out our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and be our friend on Facebook.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale!  June 19th – 21st Father’s Day Sale!  20% Off Trees!

Smooth and Panicle Hydrangeas

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

Hydrangeas are easy to grow shrubs that have strikingly large blooms perched atop sturdy stems.  Most hydrangeas grow in partial shade and will perform best with at least 4 hours of morning sunlight.  Some varieties of hydrangeas will also grow in full sun if they are kept moist.  Because their roots are shallow, they tend to dry out quickly.  Therefore, plant hydrangeas in moist, well-drained soil.  Take care not to overwater because hydrangeas don’t like “wet feet”.  Adding a thin layer of mulch will help keep moisture in.  One of the most common questions at Bloch’s Farm in Green Lake is, “How do I prune my hydrangeas?”

Pruning can be confusing when it comes to hydrangeas.  Some hydrangeas bloom on “old wood” and some bloom on “new wood”.  Blooming on “new wood” means the shrubs can be pruned in late winter or early spring and buds will form on the new wood grown in the current season.  Pruning encourages the strong new growth needed to support the weight of the large blossoms, and pruning can also lead to larger flowers.   Remove old canes or too-tall stems at ground level, and cut the rest of the stems down to about one-third of their total height.  This will provide a strong framework to support the new growth.  

Examples of hydrangeas that grow on new wood include the smooth hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens) varieties:  Annabelle, Invincibell, and Incrediball to name a few.  The smooth hydrangea is one of the easier, lower-maintenance varieties. Plant sizes vary from the 1-foot tall Invincibelle Wee White to 5-foot tall Incrediball.   The large, round flowers bloom during mid-summer.  Colors range from white to pink and may turn a greenish jade color toward the end of summer. 

Other hydrangeas that bloom on new wood are the Panicle (Hydrangea paniculata) varieties, a few of which include Bobo, Fire Light, Little Lime, Pinky Winky and Vanilla Strawberry.  These hydrangeas differ from the smooth varieties in that their flowers are more cone-shaped.  Blooming occurs in mid- to late summer, the colors beginning as white or lime green and turning pink toward summer’s end.  Panicle hydrangeas range from the 2-foot tall Bobo to the 8-foot tall Limelight, and the taller versions can be pruned into trees.  

Stop in today to get your stunningly beautiful hydrangeas!  Bloch’s Farm has many varieties available!  Call 920-294-6000 or e-mail jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com with any questions.  You can also check out our website online at www.blochsfarm.com and be our friend on Facebook.  Don’t miss out on this weekend’s sale!  June 12th- June 14th 20% off all annuals (excluding herbs and vegetables).

Shade-Tolerant Vegetables

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

A vegetable garden can bring you hours of therapeutic exercise and provide healthy foods for your table.  If you have a shady area that receives at least a few hours of sunlight each day, you can grow shade-tolerant root or leafy vegetables.  A few ideas for leafy vegetables and herbs that don’t need a lot of direct sunlight include lettuce, arugula, spinach, kale, and chives.  Bloch’s Farm in Green Lake has a full selection of vegetable seeds and plants for all your gardening needs!

Lettuce comes in a multitude of colors, textures, and flavors.  Loose-leaf varieties prefer shade but need at least 3-4 hours of sunlight per day.  In early spring, sow a variety of lettuce seeds directly into the ground.  Every two or three weeks, plant more seeds for a continuous summer crop.  Adequate moisture is a must to ensure flavorful, succulent leaves.  Harvest lettuce until the plant bolts.  Bolting is when the plant stops producing edible parts and grows a tall seed stalk.  

Arugula, a dark green leafy vegetable, can be added to salads and has a distinctive peppery taste.  Arugula is a very fast-growing vegetable that grows best in cooler temperatures with 2-3 hours of sunlight per day.  Like lettuce, you’ll want to begin succession planting in early spring.  Sow the first seeds, wait a week or so, and then plant more.  For more leaf production and better taste, harvest Arugula often when the leaves are about 4-6 inches long.  Pinch off individual leaves, pull out the whole plant, or cut it just below the soil level.  After the plant bolts, the leaves may become bitter tasting.   

Spinach is a cooler temperature crop and can even be planted before the last frost of the spring.  It grows quickly with just 4 hours of sunlight per day.  Long hot days cause spinach to bolt, so plant seeds in early spring and provide sufficient water to obtain the tastiest results.  Sow seeds again in late July for a fall/winter crop.  Harvest spinach in six to eight weeks, cutting the outer leaves to increase plant longevity.  After the plant bolts, cut off the entire spinach plant just below the soil surface.  

Kale tastes great when added to salads, mixed in with other dishes, or baked as a delicious kale chip snack.  Kale is easy to grow, needing only 4 hours of sunlight, and thrives in cooler temperatures. In fact, kale can have a sweeter taste after a light frost.  Varieties with smooth leaves are faster growing and well-suited to shady spaces.  To harvest, you can cut young leaves after a month or two to use in salads, or harvest more mature leaves for cooking.  Be sure to watch kale plants closely for rot diseases and harmful insects.

Chives are the easiest, hardiest perennial herb to grow.  If full-sun is not available, chives happily thrive in the shade, although they may have fewer blossoms. They are an appetizing addition to salads, potato soups, or any dish that needs a little oniony flavor.  Bees and butterflies love them, too!  To harvest, cut the leaves as needed. 

Bloch’s Farm is open to the public 7 days a week:  Monday through Saturday 8am to 6pm and Sundays 8am to 4pm.  Don’t miss this weekend’s sale!  25% perennial day lilies and tropical canna lilies! 

We ask that health department guidelines be followed upon your visit to the farm.  If you have questions, feel free to call 920-294-6000 or email me at jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com.

Pretty as a Petunia

 By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

An easy to grow, highly favored annual, Petunias will add a splash of color to any garden or container throughout the summer.  A myriad of options are available for you to choose from including full-colored, bi-colored, single-flowered, double-flowered, spreading, or mounding.  Come on over to Bloch’s Farm in Green Lake to check out all the beautiful varieties! 

There are four main categories of petunias.  The most popular variety is grandiflora which produces voluminous single or double flowers up to 5 inches in diameter.  The colorful blooms and ease of maintenance makes this the best variety to grow in containers or hanging baskets.  Multiflora petunias produce numerous small flowers. With sturdy stems and longer lasting blooms, they can tolerate more wind and rain.  

Milliflora petunias are the most compact variety, growing up to 8 inches tall and wide and producing lots of tiny blooms.  They blossom early in the season, require no deadheading, and are great for planting in window boxes.  Spreading petunias, such as wave petunias, are the best for ground cover being that they grow up to 6 inches tall and quickly spread out.  

To ensure continuous beautiful blooms all season long, petunias need proper sunlight, water, and fertilization.  Petunias grow best when planted in full sun.  They can tolerate partial shade but will produce fewer flowers.  Plant petunias in light, well-drained soil and water regularly, especially if you have a spreading variety or if they are planted in containers.  To keep your petunias looking superb, fertilize them monthly.  Most varieties of petunias also require trimming or deadheading to prolong their beauty.

Petunias play well with others such as zinnias, lobelia, or lantana.  Plant with upright flowers, such as snapdragons for container planting, and pair with calibrachoa or verbena in hanging baskets.  

  Bloch’s Farm is open to the public 7 days a week:  8am to 6pm Monday through Saturday and 8am to 4pm on Sundays.  Do you need some pottery for your petunias?  Don’t miss this weekend’s sale!  20% off all pottery! 

Thank you for your patience and understanding as we work through new procedures to help everyone stay healthy.  We ask that health department guidelines be followed upon your visit to the farm.  Please stay home if you are not feeling well. Keep a 6’ distance from others, and wear a mask.  Limit your party to 1-2 adults, and plan shopping ahead of time to stay focused and efficient.  For lengthy questions or discussions, consider contacting us first via email or phone.  Limit unnecessary handling of plant material and other products.  

We also continue to  offer online ordering and curbside pick-up or delivery.  For easy access to our website and online ordering, look for the “Shop Now” tab on Bloch’s Farm Facebook page or go directly to www.blochsfarm.com, and in the menu section choose “Shop Now.”  

To view a complete inventory list, choose the “Online Order Forms” tab in the menu section of the website.  Inventories are subject to availability.  If you have questions, feel free to call 920-294-6000 or email me at jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com.

Growing Vegetables In Wisconsin

By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

Plant hardiness zones and growing season lengths help us determine which vegetables are best suited for our area and when to plant them.  Our area is considered zone 5, which has a shorter growing season than warmer climates.  Of course, a bumper crop can still be harvested here with a well-timed start.  There are several options to consider, and Bloch’s Farm in Green Lake has plenty of seeds and seedlings for your vegetable garden needs!  We carry a full selection of seeds from Seed Savers, which is the largest seed exchange.  Seed Savers collect and grow rare and heirloom seeds, which are protected over generations. 

Perhaps you planted your seeds indoors to give them a head start.  If not, you can choose vegetable seeds that can be safely sown outdoors after the last frost in May and grown until the first frost in October.  Seed packets provide detailed information about “days to maturity” and the recommended planting time to help you choose varieties best suited to the length of the growing season.  It’s no fun to have beautiful tomatoes growing on the vines only to have frosty weather prevent them from ripening.  

You might also focus your growing efforts on cool season vegetables which tolerate and often prefer cooler soil and air temperatures.  These vegetable seeds need to be planted outdoors several weeks before the last frost in order to germinate and grow.  Many varieties of cool season vegetables need to complete their full growing cycle before it gets too warm or their quality deteriorates.  Excite your palate with a few of these cool season crops:  peas, lettuce, spinach, kale, swiss chard, cabbage, broccoli, and beets. 

Another option is to purchase seedlings.  Bloch’s Farm has done much of the hard work for you, and a vast variety of healthy vegetable plants are available for your gardening pleasure in greenhouse 8.  Before transplanting your seedlings outdoors, give them a week or two to become gradually acclimated to their new environment. 

Bloch’s Farm is now open to the public 7 days a week 8am to 6pm Monday through Saturday and 8am to 4pm Sundays.  Don’t miss this weekend’s sale!  30% off Fairy Garden and Terrarium items!

To protect the safety of the public and our employees, we ask that health department guidelines be followed upon your visit to the farm:  Please stay home if you are not feeling well. Keep a 6’ distance from others and wear a mask.  Limit your party to 1-2 adults, and plan shopping ahead of time to stay focused and efficient.  For lengthy questions or discussions, consider contacting us first via email or phone.  Greenhouse occupancy limits will be posted at each entrance.  Limit unnecessary handling of plant material and other products.  Credit card payments are preferred at this time.  Thank you for your patience and understanding as we work through new procedures to help everyone stay healthy.  

We also continue to offer online ordering and curbside pick-up or delivery.  For easy access to our website and online ordering, look for the “Shop Now” tab on Bloch’s Farm Facebook page or go directly to www.blochsfarm.com, and in the menu section choose “Shop Now.”  

To view a complete inventory list, choose the “Online Order Forms” tab in the menu section of the website.  Inventories are subject to availability.  If you have questions, feel free to call 920-294-6000 or email me at jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com.

Opening Friday May 1st

 Bloch’s Farm will be opening for business on Friday, May 1st. We will be open 7 days a week 8a.m. to 6 p.m. and we are so excited to welcome you back to the garden center. We would like our seniors to come between 8 a.m.to 9 a.m. Your shopping experience will look a bit different as we provide a safe and sanitized environment for everyone. To ensure everyone has a safe and enjoyable shopping experience we have put together a few guidelines.

  • Curbside pickup is available at all times at www.blochsfarm.com or on our Facebook page.
  • If you are feeling ill, please stay home.
  • We will be limiting our number of shoppers allowed at the garden center at one time according to state and CDC guidelines.
  • Our products will be displayed in a way that allows social distancing. Our spacious outdoor shopping area will make it easier for social distancing.
  • We request that you shop in groups of no more than two.
  • We encourage you to wear masks and your gardening gloves while shopping.
  • All greenhouses will be marked for one-way traffic.
  • Checkout areas will be marked with 6-foot social distance markers.
  • Cart and wagon handles will be sanitized continually throughout the day.
  • For the safety of all, we are not accepting returns until further notice.

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Thank you for supporting Bloch’s Farm and for your patience during this crazy time. We are so excited to share the beauty that Bloch’s Farm has to offer.

Elephant Ears: Colocasia

 By: Jennifer LaMontagne – Horticulturist – Bloch’s Farm – Green Lake, WI

I’ll bet you can guess why these plants are called elephant ears!  The large heart-shaped leaves of the Colocasia, commonly known as elephant ears, can add a bold accent to your garden or be an essential part of your very own tropical paradise.  Originating from the tropics of southern Asia, Colocasia is hardy in zones 7 and warmer. In our region, these eye-catching giants grow as annuals.  There are a variety of sizes and colors available at Bloch’s Farm in Green Lake!    

Colocasia is usually grown from a corm (similar to a bulb), reaching heights of 3-5 feet tall. It can be planted in containers or in the rich, moist, well-drained soil of your garden.  Its large wide leaves can grow up to 3 feet long and a variety of colorful leaves and veins ranging from lime green and pink to dark purplish-black add dramatic contrast in any space.  Colocasia can be grown in areas of part shade to full sun, and many varieties thrive at the edge of a pond or water feature.  Be sure to provide lots of regular watering and apply a slow-release fertilizer to help these tropical beauties grow to their peak magnificence.  

The versatile Colocasia can be paired with other tropical plants, such as caladiums, tropical hibiscus, or mandevilla to create a lush exotic atmosphere.  To produce interesting textural contrast, plant with ferns or ornamental grasses.  Colocasia will also be happy as the  center of attention in a bed of low growing annuals, such as petunias or begonias. 

At the end of the growing season, especially in cooler zones such as ours, bring potted Colocasia indoors for winter, or dig up the corms and store them in a cool, dry area to be replanted in spring.

Bloch’s Farm is ready for your spring planting needs.  For easy access to our website and online ordering, look for the “Shop Now” tab on Bloch’s Farm Facebook page or go directly to www.blochsfarm.com, and in the menu section choose “Shop Now.”  

To view a complete inventory list, choose the “Online Order Forms” tab in the menu section of the website.  Inventories are subject to availability.  If you have questions, feel free to call 920-294-6000 or email me at jlamontagne@blochsfarm.com.

We offer curbside pick-up or delivery for your safety and convenience.  To protect the safety of the public and our employees, we carefully adhere to current health regulations and guidelines.  We will be opening retail operations as soon as it is deemed safe to do so.  Check our website at www.blochsfarm.com and our Facebook page for updated information.